A Breathtaking Window on the Universe

October 27, 2018

Table of Contents for the Second Edition of “A Breathtaking Window on the Universe: a guide to the observatory at the Roque de los Muchachos”. Any words in bold are explained in the glossary. The second edition of “A Breathtaking Window on the Universe” is now on sale, price 17€ from shops or 15€ + P&P from this site. To continue reading, click here to buy the book.

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The Inauguration of the LST

October 16, 2018

  The Large Sized Telescope was inaugurated on Wednesday October 10th. I didn’t get chance to take many photos, because I was working. My part in the inauguration was to look after a group of 42 Japanese scientists and engineers for the day, showing them around GTC and the Roque before the speeches and ribbon cutting. The VIPs incuded Pedro Duque the science minister, and Takaaki Kajita Nobel Prize winner and director of…

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The lights went off and the stars switched on

April 22, 2018

In spite of worries about the weather, Friday night’s “Switch off the lights and switch on the stars” went really well. It was gusty, but there were very few clouds. I did wish I could have blown one off the Pleiades though. I’d hoped for more people (Note to self: next year do more advanced publicity so there’s a bigger crowd.) but I was very glad I’d invested in a…

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Turn on the Stars

April 19, 2018

Friday is the 11th anniversary of the starlight declaration. To celebrate, street lights will be turned off for an hour starting at 14 locations around the island. Most of the places will have telescopes for the public to look at the stars for free, and live music. I’ll be at Puerto Naos, at the north end of the sea front with my 4″ telescope.

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The new GOTO telescope

The first GOTO dome at Roque de Los Muchachos observatory on La Palma.
July 3, 2017

Today the GOTO telescope was inaugurated on La Palma. It’s a smallish telescope to try to find the where gravitational waves come from. That is, there are three gravitational wave detectors called LIGO Hanson (in Washington State, USA), LIGO Livingston (in Louisiana, USA) and VIRGO (in Italy) which are about 3,000 km apart, and a third one nearing completion elsewhere. Between them, they can detect gravitational waves and get a…

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